U.S.: Diane Nash says nonviolent protest was the most important invention of the 20th century
Photo Credit: Leigh Vogel via Getty Images

U.S.: Diane Nash says nonviolent protest was the most important invention of the 20th century

More than a half-century later, Diane Nash can still hear the sound of the nights she spent alone in that Mississippi jail cell. “I was scared the whole time...But here’s the thing– you had to do what was required or you had to tolerate segregation. And whenever I obeyed a segregation law I felt like I was agreeing that I was too inferior to do what the general population did.” This principled commitment to equality fueled Nash through a civil and human rights career spanning decades in the American South and in her hometown of Chicago. And while her contributions are sometimes overlooked in re-tellings of the movement in favor of some of the more ostentatious male participants, few leaders from the earliest days of the movement have been as driven, unflinching and courageous as Diane Nash.


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