The case for nonviolent struggle in Togo, according to Togolese activists
Photo Credit: Minds of the Movement

The case for nonviolent struggle in Togo, according to Togolese activists

When thousands of Togolese marched in the streets of Lomé and other cities around the world last August, demanding election reforms, it was not the first time they had come together to pressure their government for democratic change. Inoussa Moussa, a pro-democracy activist and member of the Togolese diaspora in Washington, DC, says the struggle dates back to the late 1980s and early 1990s. Having seen nonviolent uprisings give way to democratic transitions in Eastern Europe, Inoussa and other Togolese students began a democracy movement that gained momentum until the regime brutally repressed it in late fall 1990.

Inoussa left Togo for the United States in the early 2000s after drawing too much unwanted attention from the government for his pro-democracy activism. Since then, he has become a prominent actor in the Togolese diaspora. How does he spend his time? “Doing everything I can to inform the diaspora, to bring them to understand and become more interested in this patriotic struggle. My work is to try to raise awareness and mobilize the diaspora,” he says.


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